Migrant exchanges

Migrant exchanges

Over the years, the Liverpool Irish Festival has considered Irishness in terms of creative legacy and production. We have investigated Irishness via dual-heritage lives; the genetic make-up of the city; historic migration and contemporary identity theory (post-Brexit). Though we have discussed migration and migrants a lot -including causes, diaspora groups and long-term effects- we have […]

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In the Window

In the Window 2021 – a craft and design call

This is an exciting opportunity for an Irish maker (emerging or established) to display their work, for one month In the Window at the Bluecoat Display Centre as part of Liverpool Irish Festival 2021 (aka #LIF2020). We invite designers and applied artists to submit work related to the Festival theme of “exchange” (more here), to […]

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Andy Connally-web

Ireland to Liverpool

The Festival has always dreamed of having its own theme song. A tune that helps to tell our story; reflect our creativity and honour the people we serve. We thought we could use a song at the start of events -online and inperson; use it on adverts and mini-films we make for celebration days, and […]

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Language-web

Is the Irish language alive in Liverpool?

Many of you will have read campaigns about the Irish Language Act in Northern Ireland and will have views on national languages being spoken at home and abroad. Language itself can be a contentious subject; politicised and exclusionary for some, but ‘mother languages’ often transport people to happy places; to a loved one’s voice and […]

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Group-web

Finding Bridget

Maz O’Connor came to the Festival’s attention in 2018 when she discovered and shared the history she had unearthed about her family’s Irish connections. Those findings inspired her next album, Chosen Daughter and a feature we ran (article on page 24). Maz played as part of our Visible Women in 2019 and last year, told […]

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Alison Little - Quarantine - web

Quarantine – a response

We began work with Alison Little in 2016 when we first launched our In:Visible Women programme. A Liverpool based artist, activist and educator, Alison’s work layers texture and printed evidence against abuse and empowerment. Following on from the in memoriam work the Festival did with Eavan Boland’s poem Quarantine in 2020, Alison has created a […]

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