Front covers of Festival Reviews

Front covers of Festival Reviews

Since 2016, the Liverpool Irish Festival has written an in depth review of the year before (an annual report, if you will). The review focusses on the reach, range and experience its work provides. This is a critical document for understanding our work, who we reach and where our weak points are. Whilst we are extremely proud of the work we do, we know there is always more to learn. This helps us do that.

For instance, in 2018, we reached 32 of 40 residential post codes in Liverpool. Which are the eight missing and how can we address this? Why do we attract more women than men and is this bad thing? We managed a press reach of 26m – how?

Below you will find links to the reviews we have written, complete with feedback from audiences. We use these documents with our funders, stakeholders and partners. They show the range of information we collect and work we undertake to understand you and impact our work has.

If you would like to discuss anything from any of our Festival Reviews, please contact us on [email protected]


 

"Carpaccio of Giant African Land Snail", The Domestic Godless (detail only)

The Domestic Godless: Carpaccio of Giant African Land Snail

The Domestic Godless (Stephen Brandes, Irene Murphy, Mick O’Shea) have been together since 2003. Since then, it has been their mission to explore the potential of food (its taste, presentation, history and cultural values) as a vehicle for irreverent artistic endeavour and experimentation. Through recipes, installations and public presentations The Domestic Godless employ food as […]

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Cameron McKendrick's Misterman headshot (black and white, close face portrait)

‘Misterman’ – Cameron McKendrick’s rise

The Liverpool Irish Festival strives to support emerging artists and talent. Last year, we were pleased to feature Scadán within our programme; a play that considered the role of female volunteers in the Easter Rising and Liverpool’s connection to the action. Taking place in a former warehouse space, right on the waterfront, audiences were impressed […]

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Philip Hayes with a number of his collages

Collage Creations

Liverpool based artist Philip Hayes has a collage exhibition in Unit 51 at, Baltic Creative, running from 28 November-9 December 2016. In this article we celebrate his links with the Liverpool Irish Festival and look at his use of collage to develop his thinking and help with his fight for wellbeing. Philip Hayes, a leading […]

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Bobby Sands mural (c) Stuart Borthwick

Listen to LIF

Hear the stories from LIF16 on the festival podcast. Dr Paddy Hoey has spoken to some of the key speakers at festival events to hear what they have to say about Irish history, the notion of Irish-ness, about new works and stories. Dr Stuart Borthwick talks about his love of political murals in Northern Ireland […]

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Trad session at Kelly's Dispensary

Traditional Irish music: A short history of

Following conversations between Chris Kelly and the Liverpool Irish Festival, it was apparent that Chris’s knowledge of music was deep and bountiful. In the spirit of offering context to Irish culture and to increasing general understanding about its origins, pathways and future, Chris has drafted a short history on traditional Irish music, which we hope […]

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SeaLegs

The official #LIF2016 playlist

Over the years, 14 to be exact, Liverpool Irish Festival has welcomed some wonderful musicians to the city. From Rusangano Family to Van Morrison, to Irish sessions in the Cali, to Ciaran Lavery, our appreciation and love of Irish music is as wild and diverse as the music is itself. Liverpool and Ireland are brought […]

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Claude Chavasse pictured

Chavasse: the lesser known story of a hero

A Liverpool writer will explain, in a lecture in Central Library on 17 Oct, how one of the British army’s most celebrated World War One heroes had a cousin who participated in the Easter Rising. Oxford-born Noel Chavasse ( 1884-1917) was the only British soldier awarded the Victoria Cross twice in the First World War. […]

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Image of Margaret Simey's quote "the magic of Liverpool is that it isn't England", seen here as inscribed on a pillar at the Museum of Liverpool

In my Liverpool home

‘The ‘pool feels itself closer to Dublin, New York, even Buenos Aires, than it does to London… it’s very aware of its own myth and eager to project it’, George Melly, jazz musician and artist, Revolt into Style, 1970 ‘There is a great love and unity in this city, there’s a great feeling of togetherness […]

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The Union and European flags

Brexit: What now for the future of Britain and Ireland?

Britain’s recent months have been politically dominated by the fallout from the referendum which will radically alter Britain’s relationship with the European Union. Its oldest trading partner, Ireland, which was a central pillar of the Empire until 1922 and the Commonwealth until 1949, remains a member of the EU. Brexit -perhaps – means there is […]

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Detail from the Artist Centre for Human Rights logo saying 'FOR'

The Artist Centre for Human Rights

A provocation from the Artist Centre for Human Rights, details of its manifesto and why it began in Liverpool The Artist Centre for Human Rights was set up in Liverpool in the commemorative year of 2016 as an internationalist arts project that is both a cultural organisation and an evolving artwork. The Centre disseminates local […]

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The Rusangano brothers at the Kazimier Gardens in 2015 (c) Pete CarrThe Rusangano brothers at the Kazimier Gardens in 2015 (c) Pete Carr. Thi sis only a detail of the original image

A Thread of Irishness

In August this year a guest editor of the @Ireland Twitter account received a barrage of racist and sexist abuse. Michelle Marie, a black woman describing herself as a mum and model, came under attack from Twitter trolls who launched the usual sexist, racist and fattist abuse (how sad that we’ve come to expect such […]

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